All posts by vishwanath

Most Common Cyberattacks of 2019 Q4 | EC-Council Official Blog

in 2019 quarter 4, cybercriminals used different forms of cyberattacks, including ransomware, BEC, phishing, and many others, to get hold of their malicious intent.Backlinks Image For Post

Like always, even the last year wasn’t any bad for hackers! They were busy targeting and attacking major cities, state and local governments, businesses, hospitals, and schools around the globe. They used all forms of cyberattacks, including ransomware, BEC, phishing, and many others, to get hold of their malicious intent.

Organizations need a skilled workforce to fight against such intense and well-planned cyberattacks. For that, hiring certified staff would be the best solution. “Certified” professionals come with validated professional credibility. Check out Certified Ethical Hacker (C|EH), an ANSI accredited program that declared as a baseline program for getting into DoD’s Information Assurance (IA) workforce. The program focuses on offering the industry-demanded hands-on experience. It offers more than 340 attack technologies and hundreds of tools.

Most Common Cyberattacks of 2019 Q4 | EC-Council Official Blog https://blog.eccouncil.org/most-common-cyberattacks-of-2019-q4/?utm_source=BCM

84% of Employers find Cybersecurity Certifications that align with Military Job Roles as the Gold Standard for Hiring

University of Phoenix and EC-Council release a joint survey that highlights the cyber certifications employers seek in new candidatesBacklinks Image For Post

University of Phoenix and EC-Council release a joint survey that highlights the cyber certifications employers seek in new candidates

A new survey from University of Phoenix and the International Council of E-Commerce Consultants (EC-Council) found that 59% of surveyed companies with 100 or more employees plan to staff information security professionals in 2020. However, candidates in the job market may not have the skills employers are seeking. According to the survey, 67% of IT executives at companies with at least 100 employees or more require industry certifications as a basic requirement for hiring considerations.

The joint survey aimed to uncover IT employers’ perceptions during the hiring process. The findings highlighted the importance of cybersecurity degree programs paired with stackable credentials aligned to military job roles and occupations. Of the 256 IT employers who were polled, 86% said that industry certifications aligned to cyber-affiliated U.S. military job roles and occupations play an important role when hiring candidates. In fact, almost half (48%) agreed they are either very important or absolutely essential and 84% consider them to be the “gold standard” when hiring

“Cyber threats are growing exponentially, and IT employers must ensure that the candidates they are hiring possess the proper education and skills to take on these threats,” said Stephanie Benoit-Kurtz, lead cybersecurity faculty at the University’s Las Vegas Campus. “Organizations often don’t have the time or funding to invest in developing employees, and these industry certifications often provide the minimum standards to prepare professionals to combat today’s cyber threats.”

Highly regarded cybersecurity industry certifications with aligned job roles and outcomes may be easier to obtain than you think. The survey found that nearly all IT executives (91%) said that they would be likely to provide tuition assistance to an employee seeking to earn a degree that helps prepare for industry certification aligned to U.S. military job roles and occupations.

84% of Employers find Cybersecurity Certifications that align with Military Job Roles as the Gold Standard for Hiring https://blog.eccouncil.org/84-of-employers-find-cybersecurity-certifications-that-align-with-military-job-roles-as-the-gold-standard-for-hiring/?utm_source=backlink

U.S. Department of Defense Recognizes EC-Council\’s Certified Network Defender Certification – EC-Council Official Blog

The U.S. Department of Defense Cyber Workforce Advisory Group Certification Committee officially added EC-Council’s Certified Network Defender (CND) as a baseline certification in Directive 8570 as a path forward to combat cyber enemies in four workforce categoriesBacklinks Image For Post

The U.S. Department of Defense Cyber Workforce Advisory Group Certification Committee officially added EC-Council’s Certified Network Defender (CND) as a baseline certification in Directive 8570 as a path forward to combat cyber enemies in four workforce categories.

U.S. Department of Defense Recognizes EC-Council\'s Certified Network Defender Certification - EC-Council Official Blog https://blog.eccouncil.org/u-s-department-of-defense-recognizes-ec-councils-certified-network-defender-certification/?utm_source=directory

Cyber Security Posture Assessment – EC-Council Global Services (EGS)

Cyber-security posture assessment refers to a methodology that transforms and enhances an organization’s risk management capabilities. By performing cyber-security posture assessment, a client organization will have a clear view of the security status and possible security threats within the organization can be identified.Backlinks Image For Post

Cyber-security posture assessment refers to a methodology that transforms and enhances an organization’s risk management capabilities. By performing cyber-security posture assessment, a client organization will have a clear view of the security status and possible security threats within the organization can be identified.

A majority of organizations are highly dependent on the Internet and networks to run their daily business.

However, an organization is unaware of the security issues that might result in an attack (from outside or from within). Customer information, the organization’s private and confidential data, intellectual property, and information assets might leak out to the public––thereby resulting in huge financial losses and damage to the organization’s reputation.

In order to measure the overall cyber-security maturity of the organization, an independent expert assessment of the current state of its information security environment is conducted against global standards and leading industry practices. It is followed by a remediation of the identified gaps and the development of a roadmap for transformation.

Cyber Security Posture Assessment - EC-Council Global Services (EGS) https://egs.eccouncil.org/services/cyber-security-posture-assessment/?utm_source=directory

What is ethical hacking? | EC-Council Official Blog

Ethical hacking is an authorized process of attempting to gain unauthorized access over a defined network, computer, or data. It is performed by security experts called “white hats,” aimed to improve the security posture of an organization.Backlinks Image For Post

Ethical hacking is an authorized process of attempting to gain unauthorized access over a defined network, computer, or data. It is performed by security experts called “white hats,” aimed to improve the security posture of an organization. An ethical hack can be defined as how perfectly one can copy malicious hacker’s actions and strategies. Ethical hackers identify vulnerabilities and suggest resolving before malicious attackers exploited them. They work proactively while pentesting the systems or networks on approval of the organization.

Ethical hacking duplicates the black hat hacking technique to assess security vulnerabilities. Initially, ethical hackers performed reconnaissance to collect as much information as possible. The information is collected by performing automated and manual testing on the permitted area to attack. Once the vulnerabilities are identified, ethical hackers use exploits against them to explain the consequences.

It allows the user to bypass the authentication process on a web application. The attacker can perform automated attacks such as credential surfing. It is part of ethical hacking to test for broken authentication.

What is ethical hacking? | EC-Council Official Blog https://blog.eccouncil.org/what-is-ethical-hacking/

What is ethical hacking? | EC-Council Official Blog

Ethical hacking is an authorized process of attempting to gain unauthorized access over a defined network, computer, or data. It is performed by security experts called “white hats,” aimed to improve the security posture of an organization.Backlinks Image For Post

Ethical hacking is an authorized process of attempting to gain unauthorized access over a defined network, computer, or data. It is performed by security experts called “white hats,” aimed to improve the security posture of an organization. An ethical hack can be defined as how perfectly one can copy malicious hacker’s actions and strategies. Ethical hackers identify vulnerabilities and suggest resolving before malicious attackers exploited them. They work proactively while pentesting the systems or networks on approval of the organization.

Ethical hacking duplicates the black hat hacking technique to assess security vulnerabilities. Initially, ethical hackers performed reconnaissance to collect as much information as possible. The information is collected by performing automated and manual testing on the permitted area to attack. Once the vulnerabilities are identified, ethical hackers use exploits against them to explain the consequences.

It allows the user to bypass the authentication process on a web application. The attacker can perform automated attacks such as credential surfing. It is part of ethical hacking to test for broken authentication.

What is ethical hacking? | EC-Council Official Blog https://blog.eccouncil.org/what-is-ethical-hacking/